best

Best home security system 2020

Investing in the best home security system is essential if you’re serious about protecting your home, or wish to actively deter criminals from targeting your property. As such, they’re increasingly considered a household essential. 
If you’re look…

Live George Floyd Protest Updates and Video

Video

transcript

bars
0:00/3:54
–0:00

transcript

‘We’re Sick and Tired’: Voices From Minneapolis Protests

The death of George Floyd at the hands of the police set off days of protests in Minneapolis. Demonstrators challenged a curfew on Saturday and took to the streets for the fifth day in a row. Here’s why.

“We are having peaceful speeches, we have a reverend —” Protesters gathered outside in Minneapolis on Saturday, for the fifth day in a row. This group was demonstrating outside the city’s fifth police precinct. “I can’t stand the fact that some people in our society can’t walk around without feeling scared that a cop is not going to come to them with a death sentence.” Just after 8 p.m., police came out to enforce the city’s curfew. “You are in violation of Minneapolis city curfew ordinance.” They began firing pepper spray and tear gas to disperse the group. [screams] “I swear to God! I swear to —” Protesters here told us why they were out on the streets. Honestly, the world is watching the United States and more specifically Minneapolis itself to see how we’re going to react and get justice for Mr. Floyd, and for me being out here is a huge thing.” “The Minneapolis police department is notorious for their racism here. Black men are about 13 times more likely to be killed by cops than white men in the city. And I think that people just finally had enough.” “They tortured him, right? What else is there to do but get their attention?” Since George Floyd’s death, peaceful protests have mixed with looting and rioting at night. Most protesters we spoke with oppose the violence, but many said they understood the frustration and anger people are feeling. “No justice, no peace! No justice, no peace!” “We are here for justice for George. We’re sick and tired of being abused and oppressed by the police. They’ve been doing it for years and years.” “Man, we’ve got to come together as a people, as one. This racism’s been going on for too long.” “All folks, hundred years or more.” “Too long.” “All this can be replaced. The body cannot be replaced.” “The body can never be replaced.” “I don’t want to see businesses burned down. But — I mean, we’re in kind of a war zone out here. And so, that’s kind of I think the least of our worries in a lot of ways.” “Bring him, bring him, bring him one block. Bring him one block to a medic.” “What happened? Someone hit him with a bat?” “You’ve got to calm down, we’re on the same team.” “You’ve got to calm down.” “Calm down — what happened, what happened? We’ve got about 12 medics here. We do the best we can. We’ve got a combat medic here, OK? But we’ve got to dial it down —” “We’ve got to keep it down.” “— because they’re looking for any reason to kill us.” One protester described the violence that broke out after she confronted a group of rioters in the neighborhood. “There was a group of guys who started screaming at the police, throwing things. I asked them, ‘Who are you? Who are you to come in here and do this?’ They ran up on me with big steel pipes. They got in my face. And one guy came at me, holding the pipe — and he stepped in, and he took it.” “You’re going to be all right —” “What message are we sending by destroying what is ours? How does that, how does that get the message out about how we need change in our city if all we’re doing is destroying it And burning it down?”

Live George Floyd Protest Updates and Video
The death of George Floyd at the hands of the police set off days of protests in Minneapolis. Demonstrators challenged a curfew on Saturday and took to the streets for the fifth day in a row. Here’s why.CreditCredit…Mike Shum for The New York Times

Demonstrations and destruction. Confrontation and curfews. America braces for another night of protest.

In Boston, thousands of people took to streets and parks in mostly peaceful protests against police brutality. In Minneapolis, a tanker truck sped into a crowd on a highway overpass as hundreds of demonstrators scattered for safety. And in New York, a tense mood followed a night of street battles, burned cars and hundreds of arrests.

The United States remained a tinderbox of emotion, anger and continued violence on Sunday, the sixth day of nationwide unrest since the death of yet another black man at the hands of the police. The death of the man, George Floyd, last week in Minneapolis set off days of protracted protest that has swept across the country, with tumultuous demonstrations from New York City to Los Angeles and dozens of cities in between.

In Santa Monica, Calif., looters shoved aside barricades to vandalize and ransack stores Sunday, while in nearby Huntington Beach protesters against police brutality clashed with right-wing groups. And in Louisville, a tense confrontation in the middle of a crowded street was partially defused when a black woman stepped forward and offered a policeman in riot gear a hug. They embraced for nearly a minute.

In Washington, the police fired tear gas at protesters who gathered near the White House, where a demonstration on Friday night had so unnerved the Secret Service that agents abruptly rushed President Trump to an underground bunker used in the past during terrorist attacks.

Philadelphia announced a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew after a day of protests and looting there, while Washington’s mayor set one for 11 p.m. and Arizona’s governor declared a state of emergency and ordered a nightly 8 p.m. curfew that he said would be in place for a week.

At least 75 cities have seen protests in recent days, and the number of mayors and governors imposing curfews — already more than two dozen — continued to grow. It is the first time so many local leaders have simultaneously issued such orders in the face of civic unrest since 1968, after the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

On Saturday, hundreds of people were arrested across the country as clashes erupted between protesters and the police in dozens of states. In some cities, the authorities appeared to fire rubber bullets and other projectiles with little or no provocation. In New York City, two police vehicles surged forward into a crowd of demonstrators, some of whom were blocking the street and pelting the cars with debris.

National Guard soldiers were posted in Atlanta and Minneapolis and California moved troops into Los Angeles.

Sunday’s protests marked the sixth day of outrage since Mr. Floyd died as a white police officer — since fired and charged with third-degree murder — pinned his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes.

Protests Over Racism and Police Violence

Protests have erupted in at least 75 cities across the United States in the days after George Floyd, a black man, died in police custody. Some of the demonstrations have turned violent, prompting the activation of the National Guard in at least 11 states.


Protests since Wednesday

National Guard activated





Live George Floyd Protest Updates and Video

Seattle

WASH.

Portland

Missoula

MINN.

Eugene

Minneapolis

Boston

WIS.

St. Paul

Hartford

New York

Salt Lake City

Des Moines

Sacramento

Phila.

Chicago

OHIO

Lincoln

Denver

Washington

Oakland

Indianapolis

UTAH

Cincinnati

ILL.

San Jose

COLO.

Las Vegas

MO.

Kansas City

Lexington

Norfolk

KY.

Santa Fe

Tulsa

Charlotte

TENN.

Okla. City

L.A.

Columbia

Phoenix

Memphis

Atlanta

San Diego

Dallas

Tucson

GA.

Tallahassee

Houston

Austin

New Orleans

Orlando

Tampa

Miami

Live George Floyd Protest Updates and Video

Seattle

WASH.

Missoula

Portland

ME.

MONT.

Eugene

MINN.

ORE.

Minneapolis

Boston

N.Y.

WIS.

MICH.

Buffalo

St. Paul

Hartford

Detroit

Milwaukee

New York

Salt Lake City

Des Moines

Sacramento

NEB.

PA.

Chicago

Phila.

NEV.

Columbus

OHIO

Lincoln

Denver

IND.

Oakland

Washington

Indianapolis

UTAH

Richmond

San Jose

Cincinnati

ILL.

COLO.

Kansas City

VA.

Hampton

MO.

CALIF.

Las Vegas

Lexington

Louisville

Norfolk

KY.

N.C.

Santa Fe

Tulsa

Charlotte

TENN.

ARIZ.

L.A.

Okla. City

S.C.

Columbia

Albuquerque

Phoenix

Memphis

OKLA.

Atlanta

San Diego

N.M.

GA.

Dallas

Tucson

TEX.

LA.

Tallahassee

Austin

New Orleans

Orlando

Houston

Tampa

FLA.

Miami

By Weiyi Cai, Juliette Love, Jugal K. Patel and Yuliya Parshina-Kottas

Two Atlanta police officers were fired for using excessive force during a protest.

Two Atlanta police officers were fired on Sunday, one day after videos emerged showing them using stun guns on two black college students and then dragging them out of their car.

Atlanta’s mayor, Keisha Lance Bottoms, announced the dismissal of the two officers, whom she did not name, during a news conference on Sunday. She said their actions had constituted “excessive force.”

Ms. Bottoms said three other officers who were involved in the arrests had been reassigned to desk duty while the department reviews their actions.

“It was disturbing on many levels, the least of not which was that there clearly was an excessive use of force,” Ms. Bottoms said. “We understand that our officers are working very long hours under an enormous amount of stress, but we also understand that the use of excessive force is never acceptable.”

Ms. Bottoms said she had reviewed police body camera footage of the confrontation and that it should be released immediately. The episode was broadcast live on local television on Saturday night, showing a group of officers stopping a man and woman in their car near downtown Atlanta roughly 45 minutes after a curfew went into effect at 9 p.m. It was unclear what prompted the police to stop the car.

Chief Erika Shields of the Atlanta Police Department condemned the actions of the officers, saying that the two students had been “manhandled” and that the episode had only underscored the fear and wariness minorities have of the police.

“I am genuinely sorry,” Chief Shields said. “This is not who we are. This is not what we’re about.”

The actions of the Atlanta officers came amid intensifying scrutiny of how law enforcement was responding to demonstrators.

In New York City, two police S.U.V.s plowed into protesters on Saturday evening. In Salt Lake City, officers in riot gear trying to clear onlookers shoved an older man with a cane to the ground. And in Minneapolis, a video appeared to show officers yelling at people on their porches to get inside and firing paint canisters at them when they did not. “Light them up,” one officer said.

At a religious event on Sunday, the Houston police chief delivered an emotional, sermon-style speech after days of at-times violent protests in the city where George Floyd grew up, denouncing police brutality, evoking Houston’s recovery from Hurricane Harvey and saying those turning demonstrations destructive were doing “Satan’s work.”

The chief, Art Acevedo, who has marched with demonstrators and has called for charges to be filed against the four officers in Minneapolis, took off his mask at one point and pumped his arm as those assembled in their vehicles during the event honked their horns in support.

Chief Acevedo was the latest of several police chiefs in cities across the country to attend demonstrations this week, though the fact that he addressed protesters in a speech was notable.

Standing next to Representative Sheila Jackson Lee, Democrat of Texas, the chief said that he did not care what people thought of him speaking frankly. “I know my God put me in this position not to keep my job but to do my job,” he said.

A man is arrested after driving a truck through a crowd of Minnesota protesters.

ImageLive George Floyd Protest Updates and Video
Credit…Eric Miller/Reuters

A tanker truck barreled through thousands of protesters in Minneapolis on Sunday afternoon, coming to a stop as the crowd parted to avoid getting hit.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety said that no one had been struck by the truck, although some protesters told local media that they had seen people with injuries. The police said the driver was “inciting” the peaceful protesters, and that he had been arrested and treated at a hospital for non-life threatening injuries

Video

Live George Floyd Protest Updates and Video
The truck can be seen speeding toward protesters on a highway as demonstrations continued in Minneapolis for the sixth straight night.

As the tanker truck came to a stop, demonstrators who had just sprinted from its path swarmed back toward it and pulled the driver out of the cab, according to videos from the scene. As people ran toward the driver, several protesters shouted for them to not hurt him and tried to create a buffer zone.

The confrontation took place on Interstate 35, which had been partly closed to traffic because of the protest, and the police said they were working with transportation officials to determine how the truck had gotten onto the highway.

“I don’t know the motives of the driver at this time, but at this point in time, to not have tragedy and many deaths is simply an amazing thing,” Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota said at a news conference. He called video of the episode “horrifying.”

The protest had been peaceful and well-organized; the Department of Public Safety had tweeted updates about the group’s location and said its officers were working to keep the demonstrators safe.

Image

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Trump is heard, but not seen, on a simmering Sunday.

A combative President Trump on Sunday berated Democrats for not being tough enough on violent protesters and attributed the turmoil roiling the nation to radical leftists.

Spurning advice from some campaign advisers to deliver a nationally televised address, Trump instead spent Sunday out of sight.

But he kept on tweeting.

“Get tough Democrat Mayors and Governors,” he wrote. Addressing his presumptive Democratic presidential opponent, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., he added: “These people are ANARCHISTS. Call in our National Guard NOW. The World is watching and laughing at you and Sleepy Joe. Is this what America wants? NO!!!”

The president also said his administration “will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization,” employing a shorthand for “anti-fascist.” But antifa is a movement of activists who dress in black and call themselves anarchists, not an organization with a clear structure that can be penalized under law. Moreover, American law applies terrorist designations to foreign entities, not domestic groups.

While Mr. Trump has been a focus of anger, particularly in the crowds in Washington, aides repeatedly have tried to explain to him that the protests were not only about him, but about broader, systemic issues related to race. Privately, Mr. Trump’s advisers complained about his tweets, acknowledging that they were pouring fuel on an already incendiary situation.

“Those are not constructive tweets, without any question,” Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only black Republican in the Senate, said in an interview on “Fox News Sunday.”

Could protesting spread coronavirus? Officials are worried.

Image

Credit…Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

Mass protests that have brought thousands of people out of their homes and onto the streets in cities across America are raising the specter of new coronavirus outbreaks, prompting political leaders, physicians and public health experts to warn that the crowds could cause a surge in cases.

More than 100,000 Americans have already died of Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. People of color have been particularly hard hit, with rates of hospitalizations and deaths among black Americans far exceeding those of whites.

While many political leaders affirmed the right of protesters to express themselves, they urged the demonstrators to wear face masks and maintain social distancing, both to protect themselves and to prevent further community spread of the virus.

The protests are occurring as many states have warily begun reopening after weeks of stay-at-home orders.

In Los Angeles, where demonstrations led to the closing of virus testing sites on Saturday, Mayor Eric Garcetti warned that the protests could become so-called “super-spreader events” that can lead to an explosion of secondary infections. And Gov. Larry Hogan of Maryland, a Republican, expressed concern that his state would see a spike in cases in about two weeks, which is about how long it takes for symptoms to emerge after someone is infected.

Some infectious disease experts were reassured by the fact that the protests were held outdoors, saying the open air settings could mitigate the risk of transmission. In addition, many of the demonstrators were wearing masks.

National Guard commanders say troops are meant only to keep the peace.

Image

Credit…Bryan Denton for The New York Times

As President Trump painted the National Guard as key to restoring order and taunted Democratic governors and mayors for not calling out the troops, the generals in charge of troops in three states said on Sunday afternoon that they had been only in support roles and had not used any force to put down the civil unrest.

The leaders of the Minnesota, Georgia and Colorado National Guards made clear that while troops had probably had a deterrent effect, the bulk of the credit for containing the violence went to local police officers. National Guard forces have been used mostly to secure buildings, allowing more police officers to move to the front lines, they said.

“Our purpose is to allow our local law enforcement professionals to do their jobs,” said Gen. Jon Jensen, the leader of Minnesota’s National Guard. “We do that by relieving them of items like infrastructure security.”

The forces in Minnesota and Georgia are armed, but the Colorado troops have only nonlethal weaponry. The generals did not describe under what conditions they would use force, only that they would be proportional and used in self-defense.

General Jensen said he had requested additional military police battalions from the National Guard forces of neighboring states, but said he would not recommend the Minnesota governor request regular Army forces for that job, as Mr. Trump has offered.

Army Maj. Gen. Thomas Carden Jr., the adjutant general of the Georgia National Guard, expressed dismay that his forces had to be called out for a domestic civil unrest mission.

“We in America should not get used to or accept uniformed service members of any variety having to be put in a position where they are having to secure people inside the United States of America,” General Carden said. “While we are honored to do it, this is a sign of the times that we have to do better as a country.”

Looters strike Philadelphia stores while peaceful crowds protest at City Hall.

Image

Credit…Mark Makela/Getty Images

Videos posted on social media showed looting and vandalism to storefronts in parts of Philadelphia on Sunday afternoon, even as hundreds of people protested peacefully outside City Hall.

Mayor Jim Kenney of Philadelphia called the looters “anarchists” at a midday news conference, hours before all retail stores in Philadelphia were closed on Sunday afternoon. For a second night, a citywide curfew was imposed, set for 6 p.m.

The peaceful protesters’ message about racism and use of force by the police “in no way should be diminished by anarchists and others who tried to cause chaos in our city last night,” Mr. Kenney said at the news conference, adding that the instigators “did a great disservice to the many others who chose to speak out forcefully against institutional racism and violence at the hands of the police.”

Streets in the Center City business district were closed starting at noon to allow cleanup from the previous night’s protests. Mass transit service was curtailed.

Pennsylvania joined several states that moved to make it easier to activate the National Guard this weekend, and the city, along with suburban Montgomery County, asked for help from the Guard on Sunday, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Protests spread to London and Berlin.

Video

transcript

bars
0:00/0:51
–0:00

transcript

Londoners Join in Protests Against Police Brutality

Hundreds of protesters rallied in central London and marched to the United States Embassy in support of demonstrations across the U.S. that were set off by the death of George Floyd.

Say his name! George Floyd! Say his name! George Floyd! Stop killing us! George Floyd! No justice, no peace! No justice, no peace! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! George Floyd! George Floyd! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter! Black lives matter!

Live George Floyd Protest Updates and Video
Hundreds of protesters rallied in central London and marched to the United States Embassy in support of demonstrations across the U.S. that were set off by the death of George Floyd.CreditCredit…John Sibley/Reuters

Hundreds of protesters gathered in Trafalgar Square in central London on Sunday afternoon and marched toward the United States Embassy, the most visible sign so far of popular support overseas for the protests across the U.S. against police killings of black people.

Holding signs and clapping their hands, the protesters gathered in the square in defiance of stay-at-home restrictions in effect across Britain to fight the coronavirus pandemic. They chanted “I can’t breathe,” “Black lives matter,” and “No justice, no peace,” before crossing the Thames to march peacefully to the embassy.

The protest march on Sunday echoed one on Saturday in the Peckham district of South London. Another London march is planned for next Sunday.

Several hundred protesters rallied outside the U.S. Embassy in Berlin on Sunday, holding up signs saying “Justice for George Floyd” and “Stop killing us,” Reuters reported.

A disaster is declared in Texas, while in Florida, reopenings are delayed.

Image

Credit…Cristobal Herrera/EPA, via Shutterstock

As cities and states brace for more demonstrations in the coming days, the authorities have responded by calling in more resources and readjusting previously held plans.

In Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott declared a state of disaster on Sunday, an action that enables him to designate federal agents to serve as Texas peace officers. The Republican governor, who activated the Texas National Guard a day earlier, issued the disaster order after protests in the state’s major cities touched off confrontations between demonstrators and law enforcement.

“As protests have turned violent in various areas across the state, it is crucial that we maintain order, uphold public safety, and protect against property damage or loss,” Mr. Abbott said in announcing the disaster declaration. “Every Texan and every American has the right to protest and I encourage all Texans to exercise their First Amendment rights,” he said. “However, violence against others and the destruction of property is unacceptable and counterproductive.”

And in South Florida, Mayor Carlos Gimenez of Miami-Dade County postponed the planned reopening of beaches following the lockdown because of the pandemic. Miami-Dade beaches had been scheduled to open on Monday.

“The beaches will remain closed until the curfew order is lifted,” Mr. Gimenez said in a statement on Sunday. He cited an emergency order he signed on Saturday imposing a countywide curfew after a small group of protesters set police cars on fire outside the Miami Police Department’s downtown headquarters.

The beach reopenings would have involved a significant police presence. Condominium pools and hotels in the county will be allowed to reopen on Monday as planned.

Largely peaceful demonstrations take place in Austin after an official protest is called off.

Image

Credit…Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman, via Associated Press

Hundreds of protesters returned to the streets of downtown Austin on Sunday in what were described as largely peaceful demonstrations after sporadic looting and confrontations between police and protesters the previous day.

Sunday’s gatherings took place even after the Austin Justice Coalition canceled plans for an official demonstration. Organizers said they had halted the plans because they were worried about the safety of participants and because protests were being co-opted and made violent by people who were not black.

One woman who attended the gathering on Sunday said she had been pepper-sprayed by the police, and the authorities reported a possible looting incident in an outlying shopping center. But the demonstrations were relatively calm compared with Saturday, when protesters blocked traffic on I-35, set fire to several parked cars and looted businesses on Sixth Street.

Carrying placards with inscriptions such as “Black Futures Matter” and “End Racism,” the demonstrators started out at the State Capitol, marched to city hall several blocks to the south and later returned to the Capitol.

“It’s been peaceful so far,” said Sgt. Victor Taylor, a spokesman for the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Chas Moore, executive director of the Austin Justice Coalition, said in a Facebook video that on Saturday night, white people had been “burning stuff up in the name of Black Lives Matter” and that there were rumors that white provocateurs would try to hijack Sunday’s demonstration.

“You are using black pain, and you are using fake outrage in the name of Black Lives Matter to go deface and destroy property, which we would then get the blame for,” Mr. Moore said.

“To those people, to those agitators, we see you, we know who you are, and we’re not going to let you co-opt and colonize this movement like you’ve done everything else.”

Reporting was contributed by Mike Baker, Peter Baker, Julian Barnes, Johanna Barr, Katie Benner, Alan Blinder, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Chris Cameron, Shaila Dewan, Johnny Diaz, Caitlin Dickerson, Nicholas Fandos, Tess Felder, Ben Fenwick, Manny Fernandez, Russell Goldman, Maggie Haberman, Rebecca Halleck, Zach Johnk, Steve Lohr, Patricia Mazzei, Christopher Mele, David Montgomery, Elian Peltier, Roni Caryn Rabin, Rick Rojas, Simon Romero, Marc Santora, Charlie Savage, Neil Vigdor, Mihir Zaveri and Karen Zraick.

Fiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death

This live briefing has ended. Click here for the latest updates.

ImageFiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death
Credit…Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

On a fifth night of unrest in Minneapolis, protesters met a more aggressive response.

Protesters who took to the streets in Minneapolis for the fifth straight night on Saturday met a more determined response from police officers and National Guard troops, as demonstrations escalated in dozens of cities across the country — an outpouring of national anger sparked by the death of a black man in police custody.

Soon after an 8 p.m. curfew took effect, the police in Minneapolis began arresting protesters and firing tear gas and other projectiles toward crowds, and the National Guard used a helicopter to dump water on a burning car.

The forceful response reflected the desire of authorities to halt the violent protests that have spread nationwide since George Floyd, 46, died after being pinned down by a white Minneapolis police officer. There were still reports of violence and destruction: a fire on the roof of a shopping mall, a person who shot a gun at officers, and a group of people throwing items at the polic. But state officials said around 11 p.m. local time that they were encouraged by the smaller crowds and apparent decrease in damage. Much of the city was empty shortly after midnight.

But even as aerial videos from Minneapolis showed police officers largely keeping demonstrators at bay, other cities were being overwhelmed, despite hastily imposed curfews.

Mayors ordered people of the streets in many of the nation’s largest cities, including Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia and Miami. And governors in at least eight states, including Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, Colorado and Tennessee, called up National Guard troops in an attempt to impose order, often with little success.

Protests Over Racism and Police Violence

Protests have erupted in at least 75 cities across the United States in the days after George Floyd, a black man, died in police custody. Some of the demonstrations have turned violent, prompting the activation of the National Guard in at least 10 states.


Protests since Wednesday

National Guard activated





Fiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death

Seattle

WASH.

Portland

Missoula

MINN.

Eugene

Minneapolis

Boston

WIS.

St. Paul

Hartford

New York

Salt Lake City

Des Moines

Sacramento

Phila.

Chicago

OHIO

Lincoln

Denver

Washington

Oakland

Indianapolis

UTAH

Cincinnati

San Jose

COLO.

Las Vegas

MO.

Kansas City

Lexington

Norfolk

KY.

Santa Fe

Tulsa

Charlotte

TENN.

Okla. City

L.A.

Columbia

Phoenix

Memphis

Atlanta

San Diego

Dallas

Tucson

GA.

Tallahassee

Houston

Austin

New Orleans

Orlando

Tampa

Miami

Fiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death

Seattle

WASH.

Missoula

Portland

ME.

MONT.

Eugene

MINN.

ORE.

Minneapolis

Boston

N.Y.

WIS.

MICH.

Buffalo

St. Paul

Hartford

Detroit

Milwaukee

New York

Salt Lake City

Fort Wayne

Des Moines

Sacramento

NEB.

PA.

Chicago

Phila.

NEV.

Columbus

OHIO

Lincoln

Denver

IND.

Oakland

Washington

Indianapolis

UTAH

Richmond

San Jose

Cincinnati

ILL.

COLO.

Kansas City

VA.

Hampton

MO.

CALIF.

Las Vegas

Lexington

Louisville

Norfolk

KY.

N.C.

Santa Fe

Tulsa

Charlotte

TENN.

ARIZ.

L.A.

Okla. City

S.C.

Columbia

Albuquerque

Phoenix

Memphis

OKLA.

Atlanta

San Diego

N.M.

GA.

Dallas

Tucson

TEX.

LA.

Tallahassee

Austin

New Orleans

Orlando

Houston

Tampa

FLA.

Miami

By Weiyi Cai, Juliette Love, Jugal K. Patel and Yuliya Parshina-Kottas

In Tennessee, the building that houses Nashville’s City Hall was set on fire. Two police vans in New York City were filmed plowing into protesters. In Washington, demonstrators set fires and smashed the windows of buildings near the White House. The police in Indianapolis said three people had been shot during the protests — not by police officers — including one person who was killed. And in Philadelphia, the Police Department said at least 13 officers had been injured during protests.

The demonstrations continued to escalate on Friday and Saturday even after Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who was recorded kneeling on Mr. Floyd’s neck until he lost consciousness, was charged with third-degree murder.

President Trump has harshly criticized the unrest, and Attorney General William P. Barr warned on Saturday that people inflicting the destruction could face federal charges. Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota said the people defying curfews and trying to instigate police were no longer protesting police brutality, but rather seeking to exploit Mr. Floyd’s death for their own political motives.

Protests escalated nationwide throughout Saturday, prompting many cities to impose curfews.

Image

Credit…Bryan Denton for The New York Times

Tens of thousands of people were in the streets across the United States on Saturday night, as demonstrations stretched from coast to coast in a national paroxysm of rage that saw buildings set on fire, businesses looted and an aggressive response from the authorities.

Protests have taken place in at least 75 cities and have reached the gates of the White House in the days since the death of Mr. Floyd in Minneapolis. The imposition of curfews by mayors appeared to be more widespread on Saturday than at any time since the aftermath of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968.

  • In Indianapolis, one person was killed and three others were injured when a gunman fired shots at a protest, the police said.

  • In Chicago, protesters scuffled with police on Saturday afternoon, burning at least one flag and marching toward the Trump International Hotel and Tower before dispersing. About 3,000 people took part in the protests, according to local news reports. Some vandalized police vehicles and left spray-painted buildings in their wake.

  • In Los Angeles, Mayor Eric M. Garcetti issued a curfew, a day after the police made more than 500 arrests. Police used batons and rubber bullets to disperse crowds and Gov. Gavin Newsom activated the National Guard.

  • In San Francisco, Mayor London Breed issued a curfew as demonstrators arrived outside her home to protest.

  • In Miami-Dade County, Fla., Mayor Carlos Gimenez ordered a countywide curfew beginning at 11 p.m. after at least one police car was set ablaze near the Miami Police Department headquarters. Tear gas was also used to disperse crowds on Saturday evening in Jacksonville and Orlando.

  • In Washington, the National Guard was deployed outside the White House, where chanting crowds clashed with the Secret Service and attacked a Fox New reporter. Fires were set in Lafayette Park, just steps from the White House.

  • In Philadelphia, at least 13 police officers were injured when protesters began setting fires and became violent.

  • In New York City, thousands of demonstrators took to the streets for a third day, gathering at marches in Harlem, Brooklyn, Queens and outside Trump Tower in Midtown Manhattan. In the late afternoon, protesters in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn confronted the police in a series of street melees, hurling empty bottles and pieces of debris at officers who responded with billy clubs and pepper spray. A video showed a police car driving into a crowd.

  • In Richmond, Va., two police officers at the State Capitol were hospitalized with leg injuries after being struck by a baseball bat and a beer bottle, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. Earlier, the police fired tear gas at protesters, some of who launched fireworks and smashed windows.

Video

Fiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death
In a third day of demonstrations, protesters blocked traffic and marched from Brooklyn into Manhattan.CreditCredit…Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

Police and protesters clashed as flames rose on the streets outside the White House.

Image

Credit…Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times

The turmoil was on display a short distance from the White House, where President Trump had called earlier in the day for his supporters to rally. Instead, hundreds of protesters mobilized on the streets of the nation’s capital as tensions ratcheted higher.

Demonstrators hurled projectiles, including water bottles, fireworks and bricks, and wrested barricades from the police, who responded by lobbing canisters of tear gas into the crowd. Buildings up and down the streets near the White House were sprayed with graffiti, including the entrance of the Hay-Adams, a luxury hotel.

Nearby, scaffolding on a construction site behind the United States Chamber of Commerce could be seen on fire. The windows at the entrance of the building were smashed.

Around 11 p.m., two cars were set ablaze on an adjacent block, and a local bank was vandalized, its windows broken and the numbers “666” sprayed across the front.

As police officers moved to secure the block, a Chevy Suburban was engulfed in a plume of black smoke; trees nearby were on fire. The crowds retreated into Farragut Square to regroup as helicopters circled overhead, and some split off back toward the White House.

President Trump had made a series of statements throughout the day that did little to tamp down the outrage nationwide. Speaking on the South Lawn of the White House, he criticized the authorities in Minnesota for allowing protests to turn violent, and offered the help of the military to contain further demonstrations.

In a series of tweets, he called demonstrators who gathered at the White House on Friday night “professionally managed so-called ‘protesters’” and suggested that his supporters would meet them. “Tonight, I understand, is MAGA NIGHT AT THE WHITE HOUSE???”

Later Saturday, speaking from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida after observing the launch of a manned SpaceX rocket, Mr. Trump blamed the unrest in cities across the country on “Antifa and other radical left-wing groups,” drawing a distinction between “peaceful protesters” and other, more violent demonstrators.

“What we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with justice or with peace,” Mr. Trump said. “The memory of George Floyd is being dishonored by rioters, looters and anarchists.”

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, released a statement early Sunday morning appealing for calm.

“We are a nation in pain, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us,” he wrote. “We are a nation enraged, but we cannot allow our rage to consume us. We are a nation exhausted, but we will not allow our exhaustion to defeat us.”

Minnesota’s governor activated all National Guard troops, but declined the Army’s offer to deploy military police.

Image

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota activated thousands of additional National Guard troops to send to Minneapolis but declined the Army’s offer to deploy military police units, as days of protests over the death of Mr. Floyd threatened to boil over even further on Saturday.

Mr. Walz, a Democrat, acknowledged that officials had underestimated the demonstrations in Minneapolis, where despite a newly issued curfew, people burned buildings and turned the city’s streets into a smoldering battleground on Friday night. He compared the havoc to wars that Americans have fought overseas, and said he expected even more unrest on Saturday night.

“What you’ve seen in previous nights, I think, will be dwarfed by what they will do tonight,” he said.

Video

transcript

bars
0:00/1:27
–0:00

transcript

Minnesota Governor Fully Mobilizes State National Guard

Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota said he would activate the state’s entire National Guard for the first time in its history in response to protests ignited by George Floyd’s death.

Let’s be very clear: The situation in Minneapolis is no longer in any way about the murder of George Floyd. It is about attacking civil society, instilling fear and disrupting our great cities. With that being the case, as we indicated last night, our tactics again, is to try and reduce loss of life. To do what we can to restore order. I spoke early this morning with the Secretary of Defense, Esper, and with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Milley, extensively to update on the situation, receive their situation report as they’re seeing it across the country, and to suggest courses of action. So in consultation as a group, and as we said this morning, I’m authorizing and talking to General Jensen to fully mobilize the Minnesota National Guard, an action that has never been taken in the 164-year history of the Minnesota National Guard. By this afternoon, our hope is to exponentially have that force out there, to use all other resources in the state and our partnerships of sister cities across there and counties to help us. It will be a dangerous situation on the streets tonight. We will do everything in our power to restore that order that Minnesotans expect, that Minnesotans demand.

Fiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death
Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota said he would activate the state’s entire National Guard for the first time in its history in response to protests ignited by George Floyd’s death.

Pentagon officials said that Defense Secretary Mark Esper and General Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, spoke Friday with Mr. Walz, to express “willingness” to deploy military police units. The governor declined the offer, the officials said, and has since activated all of the state’s National Guard troops, up to 13,200.

Nonetheless, the U.S. Northern Command has put several military police units on four-hour status, which means they could be ready to deploy in four hours, as opposed to a day.

Commissioner John Harrington of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety said that there had been “tens of thousands” of people in the streets on Friday, more than any other night since Mr. Floyd’s death on Monday set off a wave of protests that have become increasingly destructive across the country.

Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis, looking weary after four days of outrage in his city, pleaded with residents to go home and stop burning down the local businesses that he said were even more vital in the middle of a pandemic.

“You’re not getting back at the police officer that tragically killed George Floyd by looting a town,” Mr. Frey said. “You’re not getting back at anybody.”

At least four people have been killed in violence connected with the protests.

One person was killed and three others were injured when a gunman fired shots at a protest in Indianapolis early Sunday morning, bringing to at least four the total number of people killed since Wednesday in violence connected with the protests.

The authorities were also investigating a possible connection with the shooting death of a federal officer in California.

The officer, a contract security guard for the Department of Homeland Security, was shot and killed outside a federal courthouse in Oakland, Calif., on Friday night as demonstrations in the city turned violent, with protesters setting fires, destroying property and clashing with the police.

Ken Cuccinelli, the Department of Homeland Security’s acting deputy secretary, called the attack an act of “domestic terrorism,” but the state’s governor cautioned against connecting the shooting with the protests.

“No one should rush to conflate this heinous act with the protests last night,” said Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, in a statement.

Elsewhere, people were killed when once-peaceful protests descended into violence.

The authorities in Minneapolis on Friday identified Calvin L. Horton Jr., 43, as the victim in a shooting outside a pawnshop that was being looted.

Also on Friday in Detroit, a 21-year-old man was shot to death while sitting in his car near Cadillac Square, as hundreds of protesters swarmed the streets. The police said the gunman may have known and targeted the victim and used the chaos of the demonstrations as a cover.

Early Saturday morning in St. Louis, a man was killed after protesters blocked Interstate 44, set fires and attempted to loot a FedEx truck. The man was killed, the police said, when he became caught between the truck’s two trailers as the driver attempted to wend his way through the protest.

Officials blame outsiders for stoking violence, but have little evidence.

Image

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Officials in Minnesota and Washington are claiming that outside groups are undermining the protests in Minneapolis, using them as a cover to set fires, loot stores and destroy property. But they disagree on whether far-left or far-right groups are to blame and have not offered evidence to substantiate their claims.

On Saturday, Governor Walz said the “best estimate” suggested that 80 percent of those arrested at the protests were not from the state. “I’m not trying to deflect in any way. I’m not trying to say there aren’t Minnesotans amongst this group,” Mr. Walz said. But “the vast majority,” he said, are from outside the state.

KARE, a Minneapolis television station, found that such claims may not be accurate. The station reviewed all of the arrests made by Minneapolis-based police agencies for rioting, unlawful assembly and burglary-related crimes from Friday to Saturday and found that 86 percent of those arrested listed a Minnesota address.

The mayor of St. Paul, Melvin Carter, on Saturday retracted his claim that “every single person” arrested on Friday night was from out of state. A spokesman said the mayor later learned that “more than half” are from Minnesota.

John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said the authorities were analyzing those arrested, trying to understand what online platforms they have used and who they were associated with.

“We have seen things like white supremacist organizers who have posted things on platforms about coming to Minnesota,” Mr. Harrington said. “Is this organized crime? Is this an organized a cell of terror? Where is the linkage?”

Mayor Frey also blamed outsiders for the violence. “We are now confronting white supremacists, members of organized crime, out of state instigators, and possibly even foreign actors to destroy and destabilize our city and our region,” he wrote on Twitter.

On Saturday, President Trump insisted that the protesters were far-left extremists. “The memory of George Floyd is now being exploited by rioters, looters and anarchists,” he said.

Attorney General William P. Barr echoed the claim.

“In many places it appears the violence is planned, organized and driven by anarchic and left extremist groups, far-left extremist groups, using Antifa-like tactics, many of whom travel from outside the state to promote the violence,” he said.

Residents also say that Minneapolis has a core group of white anarchists. A man known as the Umbrella Man, dressed in all black and carrying a black umbrella, who appears to be white, was filmed breaking windows at an AutoZone store.

Tension rose at protests in Los Angeles, where memories of Rodney King are still raw.

Image

Credit…Bryan Denton for The New York Times

The protest on Los Angeles’s affluent West Side began peacefully on Saturday and stayed that way for nearly three hours. Activists handed out water and food, and a crowd marched on Beverly Boulevard, chanting slogans against police brutality and waving placards.

And then it took a violent turn.

Suddenly a police car was smashed and on fire, black smoke billowing into the blue sky. A young man threw a skateboard at a police officer, and frightened men and women rushed away in every direction. Police helicopters hovered overhead, and convoys of police S.U.V.s raced to the scene.

As tensions rose on the fourth day of protests in Los Angeles over the death of George Floyd, Mayor Eric M. Garcetti declared an 8 p.m. curfew.

“Go home,” Mr. Garcetti said. “Let us put the fires out. Let us learn the lessons. Let us re-humanize each other.”

But later in the evening, looting was reported at a Nordstrom store at The Grove, an upscale mall near the area of the protest, and a small fire was burning outside.

In San Francisco, a march drew about 1,000 people but remained peaceful, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. In Oakland, Mayor Libby Schaaf called on demonstrators to stay home after violent demonstrations on Friday.

In Sacramento, police officers surrounded the State Capitol as protesters pelted them and their horses with oranges and water bottles.

Before the mayhem started in Los Angeles on Saturday afternoon, several hundred people reflecting the diversity of the city — white, black, Latino, Asian-American — had protested peacefully.

The death of Mr. Floyd and the unrest it has provoked has tugged at painful memories in Los Angeles of the Rodney King beating in 1991 and the riots that occurred the next year after the acquittal of the four police officers involved in the case.

Reporters find themselves the targets of violence from protesters and the police.

Image

Credit…Linda Tirado

A freelance photographer who was shot in the eye while covering the protests in Minneapolis on Saturday was of one of several journalists who have been attacked, arrested or otherwise harassed while covering the protests that have erupted nationwide.

With trust in the news media lagging, journalists have found themselves the target of ire on both sides of a deeply politicized crisis.

A television reporter in Louisville, Ky., was hit by a pepper ball on live television by an officer who appeared to be aiming at her.

Outside the White House, protesters attacked Leland Vittert, a Fox News correspondent and his crew, taking the journalist’s microphone and striking him with it.

In Atlanta, masses of protesters on Friday night convened on the CNN headquarters, where they broke through the front door, lobbed fireworks and vandalized the building. Earlier in the day, Omar Jimenez, a reporter for the network, was detained as he reported on live television.

“I was aiming my next shot, put my camera down for a second, and then my face exploded,” said Linda Tirado, the photojournalist. “I immediately felt blood and was screaming, ‘I’m press! I’m press!’”

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press logged about 10 different incidents that ranged from assaults to menacing in Phoenix, Indianapolis, Atlanta and Minneapolis.

“With the unraveling of civil peace around the country, reporters are perceived as a target by both the police and the protesters,” said Bruce Brown, the executive director of the Reporters Committee, “and that is an extremely frightening place to be.”

An anguished nation watched the unrest with a mix of hope and horror.

Image

Credit…Whitney Curtis for The New York Times

The mass demonstrations, some peaceful, some destructive, touched off an anguished debate on Saturday among commentators, pastors and scholars about the role of protest in forcing political and social change in America.

In the pages of the nation’s newspapers and on social media, some watched in horror and others with a sense of hope as protesters took to the streets following Mr. Floyd’s death.

The singer Selena Gomez said she had spent the last 24 hours “trying to process this all.”

“Nothing anyone says can take back what has happened,” she wrote on Twitter. “But we can and must all make sure to take action. Too many black lives have been taken from us for far too long.”

Shana L. Redmond, a scholar of music, race and politics at U.C.L.A.’s Herb Alpert School of Music, described receiving tearful calls from loved ones in Minneapolis with “tears running too fast to pause at sadness.”

“They are hot with rage and anger at the condition of Black people in that place and in this world,” she wrote on Twitter. “This is not a drill. This is our terrifying, murderous present. #MinneapolisRebellion.”

Some who sympathized with the protesters voiced concern that the destruction could undermine the goal of forcing social change.

“I understand our frustration, rage and anger but it’s of no benefit when we hurt ourselves in the process,” Jamal H. Bryant, the pastor of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in Lithonia, Ga., wrote on Twitter. “I urge adamantly for the fixing of this corrupt justice system and I pray profusely for the black businesses adversely affected!”

Video

Fiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death
On the fourth night of unrest in Minneapolis, protesters expressed outrage at the police at the Fifth Precinct as the surrounding area turned into a smoky battleground.CreditCredit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only black Republican in the Senate, who has called for the arrest of all four officers involved the arrest of Mr. Floyd, urged calm.

“I know well the anger and frustration felt throughout communities of color right now,” he wrote on Twitter. “But violence is not the answer. Violence takes the focus off #GeorgeFloyd and the real issues at hand, and gives those who prey on division more fuel. Make your voices heard, not bricks and fire.”

Brian Merchant, an author, noted how the nation was briefly distracted on Saturday by the launch of a rocket built and operated not by NASA but SpaceX, the company founded by the billionaire Elon Musk.

“The symbolism of a billionaire-owned, for-profit space company launching astronauts high above the heads of thousands of people protesting state brutality and oppression amid a global pandemic and economic collapse should not be lost on anyone,” he wrote.

On Blavity, a website geared toward black millennials, an editorial argued that the fires in Minneapolis reflected “the rage of Black protestors fed up seeing the lives of our brothers and sisters robbed by racism.”

“We are fed up because we are forced to fight a pandemic amid a pandemic,” the editorial said. “We are being disproportionately killed by systemic and overt racism at the same time — and are expected to accept these deadly conditions.”

In The Los Angeles Times, an editorial argued that the country should focus should not on the looting but on the repeated instances of the police killing black men.

“And no, police violence does not justify the rampages that erupted in Minneapolis,” the editorial said. “But as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. pointed out more than a half-century ago, ‘a riot is the language of the unheard.’”

The officer who pinned Mr. Floyd was charged with murder, and his wife is seeking a divorce.

Video

transcript

bars
0:00/1:05
–0:00

transcript

Officer Who Pinned George Floyd Is Charged With Murder

Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is in custody. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been charged by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office with murder and with manslaughter. He has been charged with third-degree murder. We are in the process of continuing to review the evidence. There may be subsequent charges later. I’ve failed to share with you — a detailed complaint will be made available to you this afternoon. I didn’t want to wait any longer to share the news that he’s in custody and has been charged with murder. We have evidence, we have the citizen’s camera’s video that — the horrible, horrific, terrible thing we’ve all seen over and over again. We have the officer’s body-worn camera. We have statements from some witnesses. We have a preliminary report from the medical examiner. We have discussions with an expert. All of that has come together. So we felt in our professional judgment it was time to charge and we have so done.

Fiery Clashes Erupt Between Police and Protesters Over George Floyd Death
Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who was seen on video using his knee to pin down George Floyd, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

The intensifying protests came after the authorities announced that the officer who pinned George Floyd to the ground had been arrested and charged with murder on Friday, a development that activists and Mr. Floyd’s family had called for but also said did not go far enough.

The officer, Derek Chauvin, 44, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, charges that come with a combined maximum sentence of 35 years.

An investigation into the three other officers who were present at the scene remains ongoing.

Mr. Floyd’s relatives have said that had wanted the more serious charge of first-degree murder.

Third-degree murder does not require an intent to kill, according to the Minnesota statute, only that the perpetrator caused someone’s death in a dangerous act “without regard for human life.” Charges of first- and second-degree murder require prosecutors to prove, in almost all cases, that the perpetrator made a decision to kill the victim.

A lawyer for Mr. Chauvin’s wife, Kellie, said that she was devastated by Mr. Floyd’s death and expressed sympathy for his family and those grieving his loss. The case has also led Ms. Chauvin to seek a divorce, the lawyer, Amanda Mason-Sekula, said in an interview on Friday night.

Reporting was contributed by Tim Arango, Mike Baker, Peter Baker, Julian E. Barnes, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Audra D.S. Burch, Helene Cooper, Manny Fernandez, Thomas Fuller, Matt Furber, Russell Goldman, Michael M. Grynbaum, Maggie Haberman, Shawn Hubler, Annie Karni, Michael Levenson, Neil MacFarquhar, Patricia Mazzei, Shawn McCreesh, Sarah Mervosh, Jeremy W. Peters, Frances Robles and Rick Rojas. Research was contributed by Jack Begg.